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Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

4 edition of Physical punishment in childhood found in the catalog.

Physical punishment in childhood

Bernadette J. Saunders

Physical punishment in childhood

the rights of the child

by Bernadette J. Saunders

  • 272 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published by John Wiley & Sons in Chichester, Hoboken, NJ .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Corporal punishment of children,
  • Child abuse -- Prevention,
  • Children"s rights

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementBernadette J. Saunders and Chris Goddard.
    ContributionsGoddard, Chris
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHQ770.4 .S28 2010
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23677670M
    ISBN 109780470682562, 9780470727065
    LC Control Number2009033753

      Researchers have found that this type of physical punishment may lead to antisocial behavior, aggression, and delinquency among children. For this reason, Skinner and other psychologists suggest that any potential short-term gains from using punishment as a behavior modification tool need to be weighed against the potential long-term consequences. Books shelved as corporal-punishment: The Spanking Librarian by K.Z. Roth, Spanking the CEO: A Strict Wife Tale by Rebecca Lawson, Quinton's Crucible by.

    62 Physical Punishment, Culture, and Rights Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics tudes have changed in recent years is the number of professional organizations that have taken official. The Effects Of Race And Childhood Corporal Punishment On Physical Aggression Towards Future Generations Of Children Words | 5 Pages. The effects of race and childhood corporal punishment on physical aggression towards future generations of children Mallika Sharma New York University There has been a significant amount of research on the impact of corporal punishment on children, and its.

    While conducting the meta-analysis, which included 62 years of collected data, Gershoff looked for associations between parental use of corporal punishment and 11 child behaviors and experiences, including several in childhood (immediate compliance, moral internalization, quality of relationship with parent, and physical abuse from that parent. Physical Child Abuse. Child physical abuse is defined by the World Health Organisation () as actions or inactions, which result in actual or potential physical harm, that are within the control of or preventable by the parent, carer, or authorised person (such as a school teacher).


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Physical punishment in childhood by Bernadette J. Saunders Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Publications such as Physical Punishment in Childhood should help to educate professionals and the public, and advance the cause of children's rights in the United States and the world." (PsycCRITIQUES, December )"It provides a very good summary of the history, language, impact and legal responses to physical punishment of children in Sweden and various English.

Physical Punishment in Childhood should help to educate professionals and the public, and advance the cause of children's rights in the United States and the world." (PsycCRITIQUES, December )Cited by: Physical Punishment: A Serious Public Health Problem.

Physical punishment is a serious public health problem throughout the world, and it profoundly affects the mental health of children and the. Physical punishment, sometimes called corporal punishment, is anything done to cause pain or discomfort in response to your child's behaviors.

Examples of physical punishment include: Physical punishment in childhood book (one of the most common methods of physical punishment) slapping, pinching, or pulling. Physical Punishment in Childhood: The Rights of the Child Book February optimal development are inextricably linked to corporal punishment in childhood, as is the physical abuse of.

Physical punishment is associated with a range of mental health problems in children, youth and adults, including depression, unhappiness, anxiety, feelings of hopelessness, use of drugs and alcohol, and general psychological maladjustment.

26 – 29 These relationships may be mediated by disruptions in parent–child attachment resulting from. The consequences of physical punishment on children are very negative.

When the child is less than two years old it can be even more severe. Physical punishment of an infant is classified as child abuse. There are plenty of mothers and fathers, however, who consider it normal to spank or otherwise physically punish their children.

Physical Punishment in Childhood explores the fine line between normalized physical punishment and illegal or unacceptable physical and emotional abuse of children. It presents important insights into this controversial issue from children, parents, grandparents and /5(3). Providing a wide spectrum of views, the authors explore the fine line between normalized physical punishment and illegal or unacceptable physical and emotional abuse of children.

It builds on the emerging field of research that provides opportunities for children to speak for themselves about their views and experiences. Provides observations from children, professionals and several. Physical punishment has been defined as “the use of physical force with the intention of causing a child to experience bodily pain or discomfort so as to correct or punish the child’s behavior.

This book gives an excellent look at the effects and motivations of corporal punishment. The conclusion of the book strikes at the heart of the religious motivation of corporal punishment by stating that love and fear do not belong together.

He quotes John's epistle saying, "There is Cited by: Cultural context and physical punishment. The immediate and long‐term impact on children.

The impact of physical punishment on parents and witnesses. The effects of physical punishment: children's voices. Children's observations of how physical punishment affects parents who use it.

Conclusion. 2 Childhood and physical punishment in historical perspective. 3 Legal responses to physical punishment. 4 Conducting sensitive and ethical research with children and adults. 5 Experiences of physical punishment at home, at school and in public places. 6 Public and professional perceptions of the effectiveness of physical punishment.

Get this from a library. Physical punishment in childhood: the rights of the child. [Bernadette J Saunders; Chris Goddard] -- "Physical Punishment in Childhood explores the fine line between normalized physical punishment and illegal or unacceptable physical and emotional abuse of.

Explore key early childhood topics such Developmentally Appropriate Practice, play, and math. from book releases to policy updates. Promotes the health, nutrition, physical activity, and safety of children, staff members, and families.

Includes standards, procedures, and resources like sample forms, letters, and checklists. Studies dating back to the early s suggest a relationship between corporal punishment and decreased cognitive ability in early childhood. Recent research has.

Physical punishment is, thus, very different from physical restraint – that which may be necessary to protect a child from self-harm or harming others. The language of physical punishment – smack, slap, beat, tap, paddle and hit etc.

– reveal that all are forms of violence which, in relation to adult victims, would amount to an by: 1. 2 Childhood and physical punishment in historical perspective 3 Legal responses to physical punishment 4 Conducting sensitive and ethical research with children and adults 5 Experiences of physical punishment at home, at school and in public places 6 Public and professional perceptions of the effectiveness of physical punishment 93Brand: Bernadette J.

Saunders. This form of punishment teaches the child that his or her action has some consequences without a physical action like a spanking. For any non-physical punishment to work one has to be consistent, firm and authoritative, and the rules set must be clear, concise and fit the action for which the child is being punished (Carter).

The effects of physical punishment on children are not just ineffective but harmful. Regardless of the fact that physical punishment is harmful many families practice it.

Most of the families practicing physical punishment believe that it is a form of disciplining their child. Adverse longitudinal outcomes of corporal punishment in childhood include involvement in intimate partner violence as an adult, both as victim and as perpetrator. Corporal punishment is a type of family violence that is legal in Australia, yet its role in the family violence scenario is Cited by: 3.

Providing a wide spectrum of views, the authors explore the fine line between normalized physical punishment and illegal or unacceptable physical and emotional abuse of children. It builds on the emerging field of research that provides opportunities for children to speak for themselves about their views and experiences.This book describes the unfolding of a global phenomenon: the legal prohibition of physical punishment of children.

Until thirty years ago, this near-universal practice was considered appropriate, necessary and a parental right. But a paradigm shift in conceptions of childhood has led to a global movement to redefine it as violence and as a violation of childrenâe(tm)s rights.